Meet the cumbiero nurse who encourages his patients to the Latin son

Meet the cumbiero nurse who encourages his patients to the Latin son
  • Despite how cold and sad a hospital environment can look, the medical body has learned over the years to implement measures that encourage patients.
  • So thousands of users on Facebook have been extremely captivated to see a nurse who dances cumbias with his patients to cheer them up.
  • It is an incredible and kind action which exceeds the limits and has made him the most beloved of social networks.

Thousands of users on Facebook have been extremely captivated by seeing a nurse who dances cumbias with his patients to lift their spirits.

It is an incredible and kind action which exceeds the limits and has made him the most beloved of social networks.

VIDEO:

Hernán León, the nurse who dances cumbias

Despite how cold and sad a hospital environment can look, the medical body has learned over the years to implement measures that help patients have less stressful days during their stay.

However, there are those who decide to go further. As is the case with Hernán León, a nurse who does his best every day to get a smile out of the patients he has to attend to within San Lorenzo Clinics.

The impact of Latin rhythms on health

However, this is not a coincidence, since it is known that dancing salsa, bachata, merengue and cha cha cha could be part of the prescription for a healthy old age. This is suggested by researchers from the University of Illinois (UIC), who studied the effect of dancing latin music in elderly people.

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Latin dance is a physical activity that, in addition to being fun, can help prevent diseases heart disease, type 2 diabetes, stroke, and other complications of old age, such as dementia.

In turn, it serves to improve balance and reduce stress.

The study presented by Márquez and his team at the Scientific Sessions on Epidemiology/Lifestyle 2016 of the American Heart Associationfocuses on a group of 54 Latinos around 65 years old, mostly Mexican women. The researchers randomly selected 54 participants from different community centers in Chicago, and divided them into two groups. For four months, one group attended Latin dance classes twice a week, while the other only attended health education classes.

ABOUT THE STUDY

The participants walked 400 meters before and after the start of the study. AThose who attended dance classes finished the walk faster than at the beginning of the study (38 seconds faster) but were also faster than those who only attended health education classes (28 seconds faster). The group that did not go to dance classes also improved their performance, but to a lesser extent (they completed the walk only 10 seconds faster than before the study).

Participants also completed a questionnaire: those who danced for four months reported doing more physical activity weekl (168 minutes more than before they started dancing), while those who didn’t take dance classes said they only got about six more minutes of exercise a week.

WHY IS DANCING EFFECTIVE?