They develop “holographic patients” to train doctors and nurses

They develop “holographic patients” to train doctors and nurses
  • HoloScenarios, a new training application based on real holographic patient scenarios, is being developed by Cambridge University.
  • Students can see themselves in real life, while interacting with holographic patients, which are medically accurate.
  • This creates a unique environment to learn and practice making vital real-time decisions and treatment options.

HoloScenariosa new training application based on real holographic patient scenarios, is being developed by Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (CUH), in association with the University of Cambridge and GigXR technology company based in Los Angeles.

The first module focuses on common respiratory conditions and emergencies.

“Mixed reality is increasingly being recognized as a useful method of simulator training,” said Dr. Arun Gupta, CUH consultant anesthetist and director of postgraduate education at Cambridge University Health Partnership, who is leading the project.

“As institutions scale acquisition, the demand for platforms that offer utility and ease of managing mixed reality learning is rapidly expanding,” he said.

Students in the same room, wearing mixed reality headsets Microsoft HoloLenscan be seen in real life, while interacting with a medically accurate holographic patient multi-layered.

This creates a unique environment to learn and practice making vital real-time decisions and treatment options.

Medical instructors can also change patient responses

Through the same type of headset, medical instructors can also change the responses of patients, introduce complications and record observations and discussionseither in person in a teaching group or remotely to multiple locations around the world, via the Internet.

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students too they can view, contribute to, and evaluate holographic patient scenarios from an Android or iOS smartphone or tablet. This means realistic and secure immersive learning can be accessed, delivered and shared around the world, with the technology now available for license to learning institutions everywhere.

Alongside the development and launch of HoloScenarios, Professor Riikka Hofmann from the Cambridge School of Education is leading a analysis of new technology as a teaching and learning resource.

“Our research aims to discover how such simulations can better support learning and accelerate the adoption of effective mixed reality training while informing ongoing development,” said Hofmann.

“We hope it will help guide institutions to implement mixed reality in their curricula, in the same way that institutions evaluate conventional resources such as textbooks, mannequins, models, or computer software, and ultimately, improve patient outcomes.

Junior Dr. Aniket Bharadwaj is one of the first to test the new technology.

“Throughout medical school, we had situations where actors acted like patients. With the pandemic, a lot of that has shifted to tablet-based interactions because of the risk to people of the virus,” she said.

“Having a hologram patient that you can see, hear and interact with is really exciting and will really make a difference in student learning.”

The first module presents a hologram of a patient with asthma, followed by anaphylaxis, pulmonary embolism, and pneumonia. More modules are being developed in cardiology and neurology.

Offered by Gig Immersive Learning Platform, HoloScenarios aims to centralize and streamline mixed reality learning access and management, and encapsulate the medical expertise of the world’s leading clinicians at CUH and across the University of Cambridge.

The new technology also could provide more flexible and cost-effective training without the high resource demands of traditional simulationwhich can make immersive training economically prohibitive.

This includes the costs of maintaining the simulation centers, their equipment, and faculty and staff hours to operate the labs and recruit and train patients.

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